CCSEW Program

Promoting Healthy Relationships

Children are not born with resilience. It is produced through the interaction of biological systems and protective factors in the social environment.

The active ingredients in building resilience are supportive relationships with parents, teachers, caregivers, and other adults in the community.

Our Childcare and Community Social-Emotional Wellness (CCSEW) Program focuses on prevention, early intervention, and treatment for young children in childcare centers and shelters throughout Palm Beach County.

Developing the capacity of adults, through workshops and consultation, in our community to meet the social-emotional needs of young children is an essential part of this program. Our team of CCSEW therapists are co-located in childcare centers and shelters throughout Palm Beach County.

Childcare, School, and Shelter Based Counseling and Support

The Center for Child Counseling's Childcare and Community Social-Emotional Wellness (CCSEW) Program brings on-site prevention, early intervention, and counseling services into childcare centers, schools, and shelters in Palm Beach County.

Current partners include: YWCA Child Development Centers, the Appleseed Preschool and Nursery, Faith Lutheran School, Opportunity Early Learning Center, Florence Fuller Child Development Centers, Achievement Centers for Children and Families, The Lord's Place, Lutheran Services Palm Beach County, the School District of Palm Beach County (the program is at Bethune and Washington Elementary in Riviera Beach) and AVDA.

Services are co-located, with our therapists and interns working as a part of the fabric of the school and community to meet the therapeutic needs of children and their families.

 

Why CCSEW is Important

For young children facing adversity, prevention and early intervention efforts that focus on attachment, resiliency, and play help develop self-regulation, executive functioning skills, and healthy relationships that last a lifetime. Our approach is research-based - meaning it really works - and can make all the difference in a young child’s life. 

The Window of Opportunity
Early childhood is a critical time for brain development and learning skills. From birth to approximately 3 years of age, a child learns how to interact with the world. Any child can and will be impacted by family disruption and problems, including illness, death, homelessness, or absence of a parent. Between the ages of birth and five, the return on investment for interventions is greatest.

Problem Behaviors
Fighting, biting, hitting, and disruptive outbursts are often symptoms -- but not the root of the problem. Feelings drive challenging behavior, so our therapists look at what is happening in a young child's life to prompt these behaviors. Young children are often unable to verbally express feelings, so we use the language they understand...play.

Click here for more detailed information about our program model.

Building Resilience

What is Resilience?

The science of resilience can help us understand why some children do well despite serious adversity. Resilience is a combination of protective factors that enable people to adapt in the face of serious hardship, and is essential to ensuring that children who experience adversity can still become healthy, productive citizens. Watch this video to learn about the fundamentals of resilience, which is built through interactions between children and their environments.

The Science of Resilience

One way to understand the development of resilience is to picture a balance scale or seesaw. Protective experiences and adaptive skills on one side counterbalance significant adversity on the other. Watch this video to visualize the science of resilience, and see how genes and experience interact to produce positive outcomes for children.

How Resilience is Built

Children are not born with resilience, which is produced through the interaction of biological systems and protective factors in the social environment. The active ingredients in building resilience are supportive relationships with parents, coaches, teachers, caregivers, and other adults in the community. Watch this video to learn how responsive exchanges with adults help children build the skills they need to manage stress and cope with adversity.

Why is Resilience So Important?

Resilience is defined as "the capacity to recover quickly from difficulties."

The single most common factor for children who develop resilience is at least one stable and committed relationship with a supportive parent, caregiver, or other adult.

Children who do well in the face of serious hardship usually have a biological resistance to adversity and strong relationships with the important adults in their family and community.

Resilience is the result of a combination of protective factors. Neither individual characteristics nor social environments alone are likely to ensure positive outcomes for children who experience prolonged periods of toxic stress. It is the interaction between biology and environment that builds a child’s ability to cope with adversity and overcome threats to healthy development.